From our geographically central location, Soundscape Engineering LLC's acoustical consultants and noise and vibration control engineers serve clients located throughout North America - in Chicago, Illinois; Detroit, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Ann Arbor, and Petoskey, Michigan; Milwaukee and Madison Wisconsin; Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, South Bend, and Northwest Indiana; Los Angeles, California; Vancouver, British Columbia; Dayton and Cincinnati Ohio, Winnipeg Manitoba; Saskatoon and Regina Saskatchewan; and elsewhere. Our engineers consult on issues of room acoustics, sound isolation, speech privacy, HVAC noise control, building vibration, and exterior noise impact. They also provide acoustic and vibration measurement services.

Acoustics. Aural aesthetics. Increased productivity. Decreased distraction. Better sleep. Deeper understanding.
Don’t we all deserve this in our buildings?

Naturally we think of acoustics for an auditorium, a music space or a worship space. But how about when we cannot hear over loud background noise from traffic or HVAC equipment? How about when we cannot concentrate at work? When we hear our neighbors? Sleepless at the hospital?

Acoustics, noise control and vibration control are an integral part of the building design. Spaces are designed for people, and people are happier when they are comfortable. And owners are happier when their building is serving its purpose.

Soundscape Engineering LLC is an independent acoustics and vibrations consulting firm. We are not a product vendor. We provide unbiased assessment, design, and measurement services. We work with designers, builders, and owners to improve the soundscapes in which we work, live, and play.

Most Recent News & Editorials

    • by Mandy Kachur

       

      NYT Article - Dear Architects: Sound Matters The character and feel of a space has more to do with just how it looks.  How it sounds either enhances or diminishes an occupant’s experience.  Michael Kimmelman in the New York Times on December 29, 2015, published an interactive article, Dear Architects: Sound Matters, that demonstrates this for various spaces and is worth a read and listen. Read it here

       

      This quote from the article hits home for me:

       

      Sound may be invisible or only unconsciously perceived, but that doesn’t make it any less an architectural material than wood, glass, concrete, stone or light.  

       

      Aural architecture can be designed to emphasize various functions of a space: connectedness, relaxation, liveliness, sereneness, privacy, solemnity.  It encourages behaviors and states of being: active, socializing, quiet, awe.  When the soundscape is in conflict with the purpose of the space, it can create tension, frustration, and isolation.  Harmony is only achieved when the visual and aural architecture reinforce each other to support the function of the space.  All building owners and occupants deserve a design that symbiotically pairs the two. 

    • On October 12, 2015, in Orlando, Florida, Mandy Kachur presented on healthcare acoustics as part of a panel at the co-sponsored Annual Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) Seminar and Annual Florida Healthcare Engineering Association (FHEA) Meeting.  Specifically, she described the senior living research project that Soundscape Engineering performed for the Facilities Guidelines Institute (FGI) and Rothschild Foundation and how the results will translate into proposed improvements to the 2018 edition of the FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities.  Additionally, she described the acoustics sections of the FGI Safety Risk Assessment Toolkit for Healthcare Facility Environments and the contributions to the document from the Acoustics Working Group, for which she served as representative.  

    • By Mandy Kachur

       

      Soundscape Engineering does not sell any products or have affiliations with any product manufacturers. Through this article, we are merely remarking on products that may be of interest to our clients and newsletter subscribers.

       

      An attractive sound absorbing panel from Snowsound USA has recently debuted on the American market. Several notable design characteristics are tapered edges and mounting hardware that stands the panels off of a surface, floats them in a mobile-like array, or suspends them in a pleasant pairing suggestive of a butterfly.A dynamic three-dimensional look is the result.